Migraine headaches are so painful that from as far back as the Stone Age, sufferers desperate for relief would submit to trepanation, literally boring or scraping a hole in the skull.

While today’s treatments (typically, administration of a class of medications called triptans) are less radical, the desperation felt by sufferers remains. Those with chronic symptoms—who get migraines 15 or more days a month—show particularly low effectiveness with triptans, and often experience negative side-effects.

Migraines are extremely common. Reports estimate 12% to 18% of the population experiences at least one episode a year. Yet, for being such a widespread malady, surprisingly little is known about the causes, other than recognition that it is inherited. Agreement on symptoms is relatively uniform. Besides head pain, sufferers often complain of hyper-sensibility to light or sound, restricted field of vision, numbness and nausea.

Controlled studies of the effects of medical cannabis on migraines are currently being published in peer-reviewed journals. A sample of these is listed below.

Medical Cannabis and Migraines: Research

Effects of Medical Marijuana on Migraine Headache Frequency in an Adult Population.
Comprehensive Review of Medicinal Marijuana, Cannabinoids, and Therapeutic Implications in Medicine and Headache: What a Long Strange Trip It’s Been…
Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD) revisited: can this concept explain the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions?
Endocannabinoids and migraine
Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD) revisited: Can this concept explain the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions?